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called "martin's dream." internees his own journey with dr. king and the legacy -- one of the grid -- the legacy of one of the greatest men this nation has ever produced. a conversation with clayborne carson coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: on this day, when we honor the memory and legacy of dr. martin luther king jr., i am pleased to be joined by dr. clayborne carson, the director of the mlk research and education institute at stanford. he joins us tonight from colorado. always good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you. tavis: at the king day to you. what do you make of the fact that, on this day, we do not just celebrate the
, once used by the late dr. martin luther king, flown from atlanta to d.c., hand delivered for tomorrow's ceremony. just how significant are the bibles used during inauguration ceremonies? and a story that weighs in. >>> plus, predicting that the president's second-term poll slice fail. you won't believe the number of folks who say that. we are talking the left and the right. next. so...how'd it go? well, dad, i spent my childhood living with monks learning the art of dealmaking. you've mastered monkey-style kung fu? no. priceline is different now. you don't even have to bid. master hahn taught you all that? oh, and he says to say (translated from cantonese) "you still owe him five bucks." your accent needs a little work. see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. visit your eyecare professional today to ask about our newest lenses, transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is
of service. [ cheers and applause ] >> and when he signed the bill, he reminded us of what dr. king often called life's most persistent and urgent question. what are you doing for others? and in my family, the only wrong answer to that question is nothing. >> chelsea clinton there speaking at the national day of service. monday isn't just inauguration day. also happens to be martin luther king jr. day. and we'll hear from his daughter bernice and find out why she says president obama's second term is actually even more important than the first one. >>> for 29-year-old pushp pushpa basnit, 2013 fleas begins on a high note. she was named cnn hero of the year for her work providing a home for children of incarcerated parents in nepal. i sat down with her after the big moment. how do you feel? you've just won. >> i think i'm dreaming. it's a big honor for me. i will never forget this night in my life. >> what was going through your mind when you were walking up on stage? >> we all are winners, definitely. i've seen my dream come true. thank you very much. i'm still -- definitely this is going
. the "i am a man" part of the memphis sanitation workers strike when dr. king was assassinated. talk to me about that piece. >> it's a text painting by an artist who works with just like that sign that we know so well from the iconic protests. he transforms that into art recognizing that we look at language as a visual thing as well when we take in art. the past is refigured in the present moment. we bring forward the king moment. more importantly, as you mentioned, the memphis sanitation workers strike moment thinking of how we got to where we are. >> it says labor and race and identity. >> yes, it does. >> it's linked to king. it's clearly male, i am a man, it's also, i am human. >> that's right. it's under lined. i am a man. there is that emphasis of what it means to stand tall and be recognized from within and saying i want to be recognized in that way. >> there's a truism that we campaign in poetry and govern many pros. how much of a poet has the president managed to be and how much might you imagine to be a poet into the second term? >> i think, certainly, the president would be the
his legacy live on. i'll have more on dr. king's legacy coming up later in the show. but first, we want to show you -- we want to share your thoughts about dr. king, about his dream on our facebook page. please head over to facebook and search "politicsnation" and like us to join the conversation that's going long after the show ends. if by blessed you mean freaked out about money well we suddenly noticed that everything was getting more expensive so we switched to the bargain detergent but i found myself using three times more than you're supposed to and the clothes still weren't as clean as with tide. so we're back to tide. they're cuter in clean clothes. thanks honey yeah you suck at folding [ laughs ] [ female announcer ] one cap of tide gives you more cleaning power than 6 caps of the bargain brand. [ woman ] that's my tide, what's yours? five days later, i had a massive heart attack. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn fro
, the inauguration also comes on the federal holiday in honor of dr. martin luther king, jr., who delivered his "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago, not far from here at the lincoln memorial. later in our special coverage, we will air excerpts of some of dr. king's less often played speeches, including "beyond vietnam." why he opposed the war in vietnam. but first, we turn to some of the voices of hope and resistance from sunday night's piece ball. not affiliated with any political party, the celebration at the mead center for american theater paid tribute to the continuing struggle for peace and justice here in the united states and throughout the world. we begin with naacp president benjamin jealoin. >> this is the place to be tonight. the challenge for our country was never to see the day when a person of color would be president, know the challenge for our country was to ensure that it would be safe for it to happen again and again. we knew it could be condoleezza rice. it could be colin powell. but we got barack obama. we got a man who was a product of a progressive movement. as we stand her
larry correia, thank you. >> it's been years since dr. martin luther king gave the "i have a dream" speech. and his niece, alvita king reflects on her uncle's legacy here in this landmark year when we return. ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing e all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. [ ship horn blows ] no, no, no! stop! humans. one day we're coming up with the theory of relativity, the next... not so much. but that's okay -- you're covered with great ideas like optional better car replacement from liberty mutual insurance. total your car and we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. learn about it at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ but for most of us it represents something more. it's the time of year that we have all wa
of the president talking about a conversations you had with dr. martin luther king and of course tomorrow is mlk day. it couldn't be a more appropriate day. i'm sure you would feel for barack obama's second inauguration. but in those conversations with martin luther king, he felt there may be an african-american president, the first black president in the next 40 years. you didn't think it would happen in your lifetime. >> it's -- that's true. i'm so excited. i'm so happy about my country. that we are growing up. >> and how do you think the president -- >> we are moving beyond ignorance. >> right. how do you think. >> sorry? >> how do you think he's done, president obama, in the first term and what would you like him to do more of in his second term? >> well, i think he's done the best he could. i think that there were number of people who as soon as he was elected put their feet down in -- their heels in to the earth and said, no matter what he does, no matter how good he is, i will not support him. i will resist his attempts to make our country better. i think that he was -- i think he was sur
. >>> well, good morning, welcome to a brand-new day, it is dr. martin luther king, jr. day, i am dave clark. >> thank you for joining us, mlk day, inauguration day, tell us what the weather will be like. >> it will be very mild to warm upper 50s and 60s and 68 in morgan hill. here is sal. >>> traffic is going well, there are no major problems getting to the bay bridge toll plaza. also the morning commute looks good coming to the mcarthur maze. let's go back to the desk. >>> topping our news, just a few hours from now for president barack obama's second term, it gets underway in washington d.c. and our very own anchor is there tori campbell she joins us with the preparations now as that will be in the parade, story? >> reporter: good morning, pam, i am -- tori campbell. >> reporter: good morning, pam, there are a lot of barricades set up and only people with tickets can get in and you need get in to the area that corresponds with your ticket. people with orange and yellow tickets need to head into that direction to get to their seats so people with orange tickets need head to that area and
that dr. king had that said there is right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> barack obama was a little- known state senator from an aillinois. the third african-american in the u.s. senate. i spoke to him after his great victory in illinois at a time when most people knew him as a skinny kid with a funny name from the south side of chicago. the phrase you have been accustomed to using, the skinny kid with a funny name from the south side of chicago. beyond that issue, how did you get beyond getting beyonpeople o vote for a guy whose name they could not renounce? >> they still screw it up sometimes. the call me alabama or yo mama. one thing that i confirmed in this race is the american people are decent people. they get confused sometimes. they're busy. there stressed. they are tired. sometimes they are watching fox news, that will ge
's bible and the bible of dr. king as well on inauguration ceremony. and i always think of that as sort of, a cycle, right, in a way, a virtuous cycle, martin luther king jr., assassinated trying to create what i think to some may be small degree, has been realized in the election and inauguration the first black president of this country. >> well, you know, with the first election, i along with so many other people just broke down and cried and cried and cried. out of thankfulness, out of remembering what we had been through. and thinking about medgar and all those other people who gave their lives and gave so much that we don't even recognize any more. and hopefully, will begin to do that in the very, very near future. >> myrlie evers-williams, we're looking forward to your three minutes, we can't wait. >> so am i. >> so great to see you. >>> so a man who marched alongside martin luther king jr. during the civil rights era, congressman john lewis, he will be here, we will speak to him in just a moment. >> we're going to talk about what this inauguration means for him and also the challen
, welcome to a brand-new day, january 21st, dr. martin luther king, jr. day. thank you for joining us, i guess steve says, enjoy the nice weather we are having tomorrow looks like another nice day, very nice around the coast and it does look like we will have more in five minutes, here is sal. >>> traffic is moving along well with the 880 split and it looks good if you are driving to the westbound bay bridge, let's go back to the desk. >>> preparations are underway for president barack obama's second inauguration which is now underway and tori campbell is there in washington d.c. where she met up with a family making their first trip, it is pretty exciting to talk to all the people out there, story. >> reporter: it really is, i have been meeting people everywhere and the sun is up and the clouds are still rolling in behind me. it is not quite as cold which is nice. just north of the capital building, it is not just the people rolling in from the metro station but you see quite a bit of media set up as well and dwight a few folks doing a lot of reporting from this section of the capital.
, the president took his oath today on two bibles, one once used by dr. martin luther king. of course today is the marking of that day, mlk day, and one of abraham lincoln. how do you see this moment in the context of that struggle because that was resonant and poignant, wasn't it? >> it was very powerful, and keep in mind he said something, martin, that tied it all together. he said that we realized long ago that we could not survive and thrive as half slave state and half free. and basically i think what he was saying is we've come a long way, and i think he showed what lincoln did to make the country stronger, again having a vision of what we could do, and then i think he tried to use that to say, okay, now a lot has happened in between those times. we still face difficulties, but let's, again, be inspired by the aspiration of those who came before us so that each person could pursue happiness, you know, life, liberty, and property, and do it in a way that made sense. so i really think -- as i listened to chris, i couldn't help but think of a note i wrote while the president was speaking
complex. >> he continued for a cause he knew was right. that's the lesson of lincoln, of dr. king and president obama. dr. reverend walker who chaired dr. king used to always remind me of his favorite kwoet from dr. king. he would say you measure not a man by the way he is stands in time of convenience, but where he stands in the times of controversy. the president, now dr. king and even lincoln before. they stood in the most controversial and perilous times. people that show leadership and stability and vision and commitment when it's the most difficult of times. any one can shine when everything is going well. but it's when it is the darkest that we can see those that really bear the brightest lights. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >> hey, lance, tell us something we don't know. let's play "hardball. "hardbal. >> good evening. let's start with this. lance slide. it's not like we didn't see this coming for a long time. extra power or linebacker hoping for some extra muscle. no, lance armstrong was an international hero. a seven time-tour de fra
in 1997 and president clinton making a reference to dr. king in his speech. >> 34 years ago, the man whose life we celebrate today, spoke to us down there, at the other end of this mall. in words that moved the conscious of a nation. like a profit of old, he told of his dream that one day america will rise up and treat all its citizens as equals before the law and in the heart. dr. martin luther king's dream was the american dream. his quest is our quest. our history has been built on such dreams and labors. and by our dreams and labors we will redeem the promise of america in the 21st century. host: from 1997, to a live view here in washington, d.c. in the area around where the parade will take place following the presidential address. he made that reference to dr. martin luther king and one will expect that the president will make a longer reference tomorrow. guest: i think so. i think tomorrow is historic moment in civil rights history. it was 50 years ago that dr. martin luther king made his "i have a dream" speech on the mall. 50 years ago was the assassination of john f. kennedy , th
is the national holiday honoring dr. martin luther king jr.. a wreath ceremony was held on sunday for the civil right's leader. among the dignataries on hand, jesse jackson, jamie foxx and chris tucker. the dr. king inauguration weekend, an intersection of history. >> the first family's busy day has already begun. the president, the first lady and their two daughters left for church at saint john's. >> sarah simmons has our coverage from the other end of pennsylvania avenue and tell us what we can expect to see. she's overlooking the parade reviewing stand at lafayette park. >> reporter: that's right. we're here right behind me is where the president will be sitting to view the parade as it comes through. here you can already see we have a lot of people already showing up taking their spot here to watch the parade as well. what a wonderful place to be able to watch it. his president will be in his glass enclosed heated area viewing the parades. it wasn't until the late 1800s actually that the parade that followed the swearing in ceremony was where most of the pomp and circumstance happened. it
] and when he signed the bill, he reminded us of what dr. king often called life's most persistent and urgent question -- what are you doing for others? and in my family, the only wrong answer to that question is nothing. but there are as many right answers as there are people in this tent today and people in our country. eva spoke about how her parents inspired her. my parents certainly inspire me every day. but today, when i engaged in a service project with my husband mark, i will be thinking about my grandmother dorothy who started giving back when she was a child. she volunteered in her local school, helping to tutor migrant workers, farm children in southern california, in reading in english and writing. as she got older and had her own children, she provided school trips. she always wanted to cook an extra lunch for someone whose parents could not provide that for them. when she got older still, her children, including my mom, had left the hall. she became a big sister to mentor young girls like her who had been neglected and abused as a child. when she got older still and she could no
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
when dr. king spoke of his dream at the feet of lincoln. before that they were jailed in jackson, mississippi as defiant freedom riders risking life, limb and liberty for the cause of civil rights. and four years ago they were in tears as barack obama fulfilled the dream. >> it was just joyous. >> reporter: here they were again today, living proof of how far america can come in one lifetime. and like much of the crowd they were more subdued and reflective than they were during the first oath. >> every president has shortcomings and all have great hopes and dreams going into it and the cold hard reality of washington politics hits. >> what stories do you tell from this era to help kids understand how big this is. >> we went from this to this in your lifetime. >> the young persons found a cause and a reason to do what we did. there are causes that they, too, can find. >> what do you say to the 47% of americans who voted the other way? >> there are many points that we can all agree on. let's find those and work from there.
to cast them in terms and in tones that honored the founders, that honored dr. king, honored the best in the country. and i think in the old way of seeing things, that would be a left thing to do. he is speaking though to the emerging majority in america which is brown, young, which is much more open to the ideas around marriage equality. he is speaking to the america that is rising. i don't think that's left versus right. i think it is right versus wrong in the context of the new majority. >> if i can disagree a little. it seems to me to be left when you say government can't cure society's ills alone. in other words, the center of curing society's ills is always government. on occasion, government needs a little help. no, no, he said that today though. he is being misquoted. >> a critical distinction between the way president reagan stated his philosophy. president reagan and many on the right begin from a premise of negativity. government is the problem, not the solution said president reagan. president obama did not bash business. he did not bash individuals. in fact, he went out o
. we must continue to fight. it took the dr. kings, the rosa parks, to make it possible for us to have an open america. it took those that fought for gender equality and gay and l z lesbian rights and labor rights to open up america, it takes those of us now to continue to fight. we have gone through a turbulent time, we've gone through turbulent history. but we've not arrived yet. when you fly, you don't get off the plane when you get out of turbulence, you get off once you've reached your destination. until we get to the destination of this country, this nation living up to its creed, it will not be time for us to dislodge those that do what is necessary to keep this nation moving forward, both in office and those that are out of office and in the streets of this nation raising issues. that's what king day is about. that's what the victory of b arksz barack obama is a victory of. thanks for watching. a special live edition of "hardball" starts right now. >>> well, welcome, good evening, i'm chris matthews live from the news room in washington wra i've been all day. it's been a day o
, beverly mckinney sees living proof of dr. king's dream realized. >> you as an individual have the opportunity to make a difference in this world. if you don't do that, it was all nor naught. >> reporter: a message these former southern californians say has inspired own family. their son won the presidential award for academics and a trip they hope will stay with him forever. >> i tell my son, strive for the best, maybe you could be the first hispanic. >> and christin ayers is in washington for this morning's inaugural event. >> and she joins us by the phone from the national mall where the stage is set and security is mighty tight as well. good morning, give us your impressions. you've been there i would imagine several hours so far just going through security and whatnot, right. >> reporter: that's right, we have been here for hours and security is tight. we stood in line for about 3 1/2 hours trying to get through a media entrance and were later let through along with the rest of the general public. a chilly morning standing out and wait
of office he will honor the life of dr. martin luther king jr. the parade will start at martin luther king jr. boulevard and utah street and expanding at baltimore street. a group of teenagers took center stage in a celebration to honor dr. king for residents who recognize the type of character he often spoke of two of them are students at school of technology environmental science. she told us she was surprised to be singled out. >> i wouldn't think that i would be commended for doing something i have been taught to do that you should do to give back to your community and serve one another. best feeling in the world. >> in addition to the students two adults were honored for giving back to the community. >> in part one we heard the long-winded admission from a disgraced cyclist lance armstrong. >> up next what he says was the lowest point of his life and what he told his own children. what he told his own children. and they won't be beginners for long. give a couple beginners a great idea, they'll go to where they can get the skills, the savings, and the supplies they need - to go from be
assessment -- martin luther king, jr. [applause] so the president will clearly be in the foreground, but dr. king looms large as the backdrop. now, word comes from the white house that they will use his bible for this historic and iconic celebration, so we will talk tonight about how we honor the legacy of dr. king by focusing more attention on the issue that he gave his life for -- the poor. king once said we have to civilize ourselves by the immediate abolition of poverty. obviously, we are not quite there yet, but we of tonight's conversation will aid us and of that as in trying to make sure that we look out for the least among us. i am pleased tonight to be joined by an all-star panel. i want to introduce them one by one and jumped right into the conversation. i want to start by thanking c- span for carrying this program live around the world tonight. [applause] thank you, c-span. as the conversation gets under way, we will tell you more about what you can do at home or wherever you might be watching tonight to join in the conversation, but for now, let me introduce the novice panel of
this with grace and dignity, like dr. martin luther king jr.. he said the most persistent question is -- what are you doing for others? it is a good word for all of us. it should bring in our ears for his birthday weekend. regardless of our differences, we have the same dreams for a better life for our children and grand children. i hope they can go up in the freedom that has uniquely been the united states of america. the united states of america. >> i, barack obama, do solemnly swear -- >> this weekend, president obama begins his second term, sunday, the official swearing-in ceremony at the white house before noon eastern. coverage include your phone calls and a look at the 2009 inaugural address and then the public ceremony with the swearing in at noon eastern and other festivities, including the luncheon and the afternoon parade. coverage begins at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span radio and c- span.org. join the conversation on facebook.com/c-span. >> new features including video feeds from our c-span crew, on demand of the major events, individual -- visual blog page of behind-the-scenes phot
day. it's not just dr. king's birthday celebration, but it's also the 50th anniversary this year of his historic speech during the march on washington, the "i have a dream" speech. and since this president been elected, there is a memorial to dr. martin luther king jr. on the mall. it's not just abraham lincoln or washington or jefferson or roosevelt but also standing nearby martin luther king jr. and it says something for our nation that we're going to create a beloved community, we're going to create a society that is free of racism and bigotry and no one will be left out or left behind. doesn't matter whether you're black or white lashgs tino, asian-american, native american. it doesn't matter where you're straight or gay. dr. king legacy is saying that we are one people, we are one family, we are one house. we make up the american house, the american family. >> amen to that, representative john lewis. thanks for your time. >> thank you. >> in a moment, the big three on how president obama can bridge the political divide in washington. ♪ [ slap! ] [ male announcer ] your fav
with a conversation about dr. martin luther king jr. who preached at the national cathedral four days before he died. and you talked about how he was really giving a wake-up call to the religious to sort of spread the word. how does that story relate to modern times and to what president obama is going to have to do in your perspective, in the next four years. >> well i used it as, with the national cathedral, we're being very supportive of the president's agenda on gun control. and i actually used that as an occasion to talk about dr. king's appearance in that pulpit. about the nonviolence or nonexistence and we had to solve the problem of war and bloodshed. i used it this morning as a rallying cry to ask people in our following to really, get up behind the president. i do think at the time, dr. king was saying that the faith community has to really wake up and not sleep through a revolution, which was his point in 1968. and i think for us in 2013, the issue is how can the faith community be a real voice in public policy and an appropriate way. and i think that is where the conversation at least fo
our schools are setting up academies. dart -- dr. martin luther king academy of leadership and enterprise. or they will name them for langston hughes, frederick douglass. -- frederick douglass. i do not think a lot people should let the name the schools. [laughter] [applause] they should name it for people they do not like. [laughter] here are a few points. i will be unfashionable tonight. everyone in washington seems to think the way to solve the problems in our schools is to not give them another cent, another penny, to improve and make the schools look like places that are inviting and respect the value of children. aesthetics count. do not do that, but beat up on their teachers. that is the trend today. [applause] attack the unions. i heard about the teachers union from teachers in l.a. last fall. i flew to chicago to stand with them the day they went on strike. they were right to go on strike. [applause] i will tell you something. i am in schools all the time. when i was a young teacher, i remember this. schools are overwhelmingly -- the teachers are women. you go to a
celebrate the life of dr. martin luther king, jr.. my understanding there is statue of him just above and i wonder how that will play into matters today? >> that's right. president obama made reference in recent days feeling connection to dr. king 50 years ago. also to president lincoln, 150 years ago, and so, as part of the inaugurations, we've seen him use bibles from dr. king and also from president lincoln. there is a statue. there is a statue of dr. king in the capitol rotunda of dr. king. so, this martin luther king holiday, obviously takes on extra significance here in the rotunda. we'll watch obviously to see what the president may do throughout the course of his time here in the rotunda. shepard: mike, it was interesting to hear the matters the president brought up, came up throughout this day. we heard, a lot about climate change, the tragedy of newtown came up repeatedly, which clearly, news from the future i believe. from an agenda at least, from the president himself. those were two highlights along with ending the war and bringing the peace and coming together. a lot right the
in the past. particularly the one for which the man was honored today dr. martin luther king was so famous and civil rights. in fact civil rights for gays was a centerpiece of the president wants speech today. he said more about it than any president in a presidential address. while is he preoccupied with social justice that's in part because these other issues that you spoke about, invog gore rating the economy which has had such anemic recovery and dealing with the burgeoning deficits and exploding national debt are issues that don't particularly interest him. i'm not sure that the economy ever has. you may recall when he first took office he got through congress this stimulus package which was kind of a grab bag of spending of all kinds favored by members of his party in congress and then he basically abandoned the issue to take on something that i think appealed to him much more, that being the reform of the healthcare system. known as obama care which was adding another entitlement. >> >> bill: let me stop you there you would agree with me that president obama is a i have intelligent
, bobby kennedy was her -- assassinated two days before i walked across the stage for graduation. dr. king, the one who got week engaged in politics, was assassinated earlier that year. even assassination attempt at a george wallace. it is no wonder things held together quite frankly. well, the congress passed what was then called the gun control act. among other things it said that felons, fugitives, drug users, those who have been adjudicated and it is not a politically correct phrase, but it is in the law, those that are mentally affected could not own a gun. 1994 as a world change in country changed, along with the thing i am proud is for having written and passed about. we added a new category of people who were prohibited from purchasing a gun. based on facts, not on fiction. that is those who had a restraining order issued against them in a domestic violence incident. that was a fight to get that added. then, two years later we expanded the list again to include anyone convicted of a misdemeanor violent crime, that they were the most likely people to do something. time and experienc
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 102 (some duplicates have been removed)

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